Bijoux Pattern Co. Victorian Corset: A Review of Sorts

Well. It’s been a lot longer between posts than I meant for it to be. I’ve been drowning in a project that I started back in December and fought with right up to April 1st, and it took up so much of my time and caused me so much doubt and frustration, that although I meant to write a post about my Victorian corset, I haven’t been able to until now.

This corset gave me a bit of trouble, and in the middle of it last year it felt like it was weighing on me quite a bit (though now I know how much worse it could be, after the project I’ve just finished…). But it did turn out very well in the end, and once it got finished I was quite happy with it, and boy is it comfy to wear, too!

VictorianCorset

The finished corset, on my duct tape dress form.

Sometime early last year I purchased a corset kit and a copy of the Bijoux Pattern Co. #1 Ladies Victorian Corset pattern from corsetmaking.com. You have the option of buying the Laughing Moon pattern with the corset kit, but I priced it out and realized it was less expensive to buy the Bijou Pattern, which is a division of Laughing Moon, separately, so that’s what I did. I’m not sure if that was the cause of my troubles, but as you’ll see, the Bijoux Pattern version left me slightly less than impressed.

One of the first things that I noticed as I began looking over the measurements and double checking which size I needed was that the instruction sheet referred to fitting instructions that were not included in my packet.

VictorianCorsetinst1

There was no reference to the fitting instructions on the little “contents” page that listed things like the size chart, fabric and notions, and pattern piece illustrations. And the fact that the phrase finishes with those xx’s in place of a page number made it feel like the instruction sheet was hastily thrown together and someone didn’t take the time to make sure everything was accurate and included. (Also notice the misspelling of “coutil” next to the right-most pattern piece drawing.)

As I read through the instructions I noticed a few more typos that didn’t alleviate the feeling of haste and disorganization.

VictorianCorsetins3

VictorianCorsetinst4

In the end I had to simply trust that the measurements chart was pointing me in the right direction in order to choose a size to make. Luckily my proportions are pretty standard, so I can usually trust that patterns as printed will fit me okay. If I had an extra long or short torso, or a larger cup size, or was wider in the hip than the chest, I don’t know what I would have done without the fitting instructions. Assuming these mythical fitting instructions even include adjustments for things like that.

My mockup seemed to fit okay, so after testing it out I got to work in the real fabrics. Unfortunately I seem to have neglected to take photos of most of the progress on this! Or the photos were lost somewhere in the year it’s been since I started work on this corset. But basically I used plain white coutil that came with my corsetmaking.com kit and basted a thin pink indeterminate stash buster fabric over it.

When I got to the lacing grommets, as you do pretty quickly when corset-making, as they have to go in before much of the pieces are sewn together, thus ensued the Great Sewing Injury of 2017, which I wrote about in May of last year (tl;dr: grommet pliers are bad and can cause muscle stress injuries, don’t use them. Grommet anvil and die sets are infinitely better, and grommet presses better still). I’m actually still suffering effects of my grommet pliers injury, as the muscles in my hand will sometimes tense up or my knuckle will start twitching if I’ve strained it too much by say, carrying a heavy bag of groceries, or driving for 3 hours gripping the steering wheel anxiously. Anyway, at the time of the injury I had to put aside the corset for a few months to recuperate, and also because I didn’t have an alternative tool to put the other half of the grommets in with. I finally purchased a die and anvil kit and lo and behold, the grommets set much easier and much neater than with the pliers. And no injuries.

VictorianCorsetgrommets

Pliers-set on the right, die and anvil-set on the left. Seriously, step away from the pliers.

I’m now happy to announce that I received an amazing gift of a grommet press for Christmas after this whole debacle and I’ll never have to struggle with grommets again. (I cried a little bit, actually. My boyfriend’s mother was very confused that I was crying over getting a tool for Christmas).

After finishing the grommets, the rest of the corset proceeded almost astonishingly fast.

VictorianCorsetunbound

All pieces sewn together, no bones or binding yet.

I soon encountered another issue, though, when I went to put the bones in. The kit I had purchased came with pre-cut lengths of spiral steel. This being my first time boning with steel, I didn’t catch the fact that the items in the listing didn’t include any flat steel, which you need for the back opening at the very least. And because the spiral steel was pre-cut, it didn’t all quite fit the boning channels as I placed them, so I came up short. I ended up having to measure the channels I had left and place another order from the site. I also ordered additional pieces of flat steel to place in with my busk, because the busk I received with the kit was a bit bendier than I thought it should be, so I wanted to reinforce it.

Once I had that sorted out the rest of it went together very quickly. I lined it with map fabric left over from a dress that I made a couple years ago.

VictorianCorsetinnards

The bit of lacing that came with the kit could have stood to be a bit longer, but I’m able to get it on and lace myself down just fine. And it is COMFY. I’ve already worn it for 10-12 hours at a time no problem, and I seem to be able to eat all I want (within reason) without it starting to feel pinched. Perhaps I got lucky and the pattern was basically drafted for someone proportioned just like me. Whatever it is, I hope this one lasts for a long time, because I don’t know if I’ll ever luck out and end up with this comfortable a corset again.

VictorianCorsetside

VictorianCorset

So, in summary, this pattern is probably okay if you’re confident in your measurements or knowledgeable enough to make fitting adjustments on your own, but it’s probably not the best beginner corset pattern. I’ve never seen the instructions that come with the actual Laughing Moon branded version of this pattern, but for some reason the Bijou Pattern branded version is a bit lacking. Also, it’s probably safer to wait to get your steel bones until after your pattern pieces are assembled and you can get accurate measurements for exactly what you need. Kits sound tempting, but next time around I’d rather be able to choose the lengths myself. Also, I’ll say it again. Do not use grommet pliers. Just don’t.

And since I was going on a bit about it at the beginning of this post, here’s a teaser of the project I just finished. I will rant about this one a bit later, after I’ve recovered.

BallGowntease

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s